Special interests: “Make Maine people pay more for energy.”

A transmission substation that brings electricity to the U.S. from Canada. Photo by Mark Lorenz, Boston Globe.

A transmission substation that brings electricity to the U.S. from Canada. Photo by Mark Lorenz, Boston Globe.

Two abundant and very clean sources of energy in northeast North America are natural gas and hydroelectric power. And yet loud voices don’t want those sources to lower your energy bills here in Maine. Find that hard to believe? Get used to the idea.

As the Boston Globe reported in late July, “Across the Canadian border, massive dams generate a seemingly endless supply of hydroelectricity — a source of power that could help New England replace its closing coal and nuclear plants while cutting greenhouse gas emissions that contribute to climate change.”

But there are folks who don’t want you to have it --- because it’s too affordable. Special interests “worry that easy access to low-cost hydroelectricity will undermine the competitiveness of emerging alternative energy technologies and slow or derail their development,” according to the Globe.

…(S)olar, wind, and other renewables…remain intermittent power sources without the scale to easily replace…more than 4,000 megawatts of generating capacity.
— Erin Ailworth, Reporter, Boston Globe

Those special interests include wind developers, who blow up the tops of Maine’s scenic mountains to build industrial wind turbines that only work 25% of the time --- as often as wind velocity cooperates in this state. That’s why fossil fuel plants are required to stay online and back up those turbines --- 75% of the time.

So remember that wind developers’ blather about green energy has at least two caveats. First, they don’t want other sources of green energy to compete with them. Second, the green they’re really interested in is the green they pocket, taxpayer and ratepayer subsidies. As always, follow the money.

CLICK HERE for complete Boston Globe article.